Pocket Watch Chain

Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775

Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775
Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775

Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775    Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775

A mint and very rare condition solid silver late-18th century verge chain driven fusee consular cased pocket watch by Thomas Edwards of Ripon, fully serviced, overhauled and keeping good verge time. The watch with the rare feature of a heavy and substantial silver pair case in fabulous condition. The watch has been fully serviced and overhauled by my watch maker. The watch comes from a private collection where it has clearly been looked after.

On the evening of April 18, 1775, Paul Revere was sent for by Dr. Joseph Warren, the last major patriot leader left in Boston and a personal friend of Reveres. When he arrived at Dr. Warrens surgery, Revere found out that British regular troops were preparing to march to Concord, Massachusetts, to capture or destroy military stores that had been gathered there. Warren informed Revere that he had just received intelligence from his own spy network that the troops planned to stop in Lexington, Massachusetts, on the road to Concord and arrest Samuel Adams.

Patriot leaders who were staying in a house owned by one of Hancocks relatives. Warren begged Revere to stop in Lexington and warn Adams and Hancock to get out of the way of the British troops. Warren also informed Revere that he had already sent one messenger to Lexington a Mr. William Dawes who had taken the longer land route out Boston Neck, around Back Bay, and over the bridge into Cambridge, Massachusetts, by Harvard College. The friend hung two lanterns, meaning the British planned to leave Boston by sea across the Charles River, as opposed to a single lantern, which would mean the troops planned to march entirely by land, by the same route William Dawes had taken.

Presumably the water route would be shorter, although as it turned out the troops were so slow it really mattered very little which way they went. Successfully passing by the British warship HMS Somerset, that had been anchored close by where the ferries normally crossed to Charlestown, the two men dropped Revere off near the old Charlestown battery just outside of town.

Making him way into Charlestown, Revere met with the local Sons of Liberty, who verified that they had seen his lantern signals (which by then were no longer necessary). Revere then borrowed a horse from Charlestown patriot John Larkin (who actually had to get the horse from his father, Samuel Larkin) and then set off through the countryside northwest towards Lexington and Concord. Narrowly escaping capture by a British patrol just outside of Charlestown, Revere charged his planned route somewhat and arrived in Lexington just past midnight. We do not know what he said at each of the houses along the road.

We do know exactly what he said when he got to Lexington, however, as there was a sentry on duty outside the house where Adams and Hancock lodged, and that sentry, a Sergeant Monroe, later wrote down what happened. As Revere approached the house, Monroe told him not to make so much noise, that everyone in the house had retired for the night. Youll have noise enough before long!

The regulars are coming out! Despite this, Revere still had trouble convincing the sentry to let him pass until John Hancock, who was still awake and heard the commotion, recognized Reveres voice, after which Revere was allowed to enter the house and deliver his news. About 30 minutes later William Dawes arrived. The two messengers refreshed themselves (probably got something to eat and drink) and then decided to continue on to the town of Concord, to verify that the military stores had been properly dispersed and hidden away. Along the road they were joined by a third man, a Dr.

Samuel Prescott, who they recognized as a High Son of Liberty. Soon afterwards they were all stopped by a British patrol.

Dawes, who had probably turned aside to alarm a house, noticed what was going on and made his escape. The British herded Prescott and Revere into a nearby meadow, when Prescott suddenly said Put on!

(meaning scatter) and the two patriots suddenly rode off in different directions. Prescott, a local man, successfully eluded capture, and alarmed the militia in Lincoln and Concord; Revere chose the wrong patch of woods to head for and was recaptured by more British soldiers. Held for a while, questioned, and even threatened, Revere was eventually released, although his horse was confiscated.

Making his way back into Lexington on foot, Revere assisted Adams and Hancock to leave for Woburn, Massachusetts. Revere and Hancocks secretary, a Mr. Lowell, were engaged in carrying away a trunk of papers that Hancock had left behind when the British troops marched onto Lexington Green. Revere reported that he could hear the gunshots and see the smoke from the musket fire when the skirmish of Lexington Green began, but he could not identify who had fired first, as a building just then obscured his view. UNUSUAL FEATURES : The watch in simply magnificent condition and from a private collection where it has clearly been looked after very well.

Watches from this period with no pin holes, excess solder filling or stretch marks are very uncommon today. The watch is best described as a time-capsule from the 18th century in simply stunning condition. THE DIAL : 98% mint, the sepia coloured enamel dial with black Roman numerals in stunning condition with no hairlines, but a small surface mark to dial edge at 1.00.

Finely made beetle and poker hands. The bullseye glass in very fine condition, with a tiny edge chip. The dial shows Paul Revere riding to warn the Delaware river, on the night of the 25th December 1775, during the revolutionary war in America. THE MOVEMENT : 100% mint, with richly gilded full plate in wonderful condition. The well engraved and carved rococo style balance cock and large foot in superb condition with horn of plenty to t he balance cock foot with beautifully engraved roc occo design. The back plate with further gilded decoration and finely made silvered Tompion time regulator plate with finely pierced and decorated additional plate and do note the decoration around the time regulator plate.

The watch signed, Thomas Edwards of Ripon , number 101. The watch is key-wind, comes with a key and is ticking very strongly indeed and movement size is 34 mm diameter. The movement with square ballustar pillars. Polished steel movement bolt with its original blued steel ornate screw.

Pierced gilded fusee stop work with iron hinge. The movement with several high quality features.

These consist of the fusee ratchet on the outside of the fusee, the third wheel is positioned at the top of the movement and the mainspring setup is under the dial. The screws are original, and the gilding is still bright and fresh. THE CASE : 100% mint, the beautifully finished silver pair case measures 53 mm outside diameter. The five knuckle square outer case hinge is excellent with the case closing tight and like-wise the inner case hinge also closes tight and measures 42 mm, with inner leather.

The inner case with matching number 1759. The pendant and bow, in superb condition, the case button lightly worn as normally found. The surface is complete and in very fine and bright condition.

The case of heavy gauge and a good weight and feel in the pocket. This is a very fine Georgian period antique in simply stunning condition, which is a very rare collectable item or a possible investment for the future or of course a fine gift for a birthday, anniversary, wedding etc. TERMS AND CONDITIONS: Please note, the magnified electronic images show detail much greater than would be visible with the naked eye. Any dark areas or marks on highly polished surfaces are almost certainly reflections from the camera or lighting equipment. If there are any marks or dents of any note, these will be mentioned in the description. Us and return it, and we will repair it and return it to you free of charge. The only exception to this, is if the watch has been misused or damaged. Please note that we do not accept 3rd part watch makers repairs or invoices. Us and every effort will be made to ensure that any problems are resolved to your satisfaction. The item "Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775" is in sale since Thursday, July 4, 2019. This item is in the category "Jewellery & Watches\Watches, Parts & Accessories\Other Watches". The seller is "vintagewatchstores" and is located in London. This item can be shipped worldwide.

  • Modified Item: No


Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775    Georgian Silver Ripon Chain Fusee Verge Paul Revere Pair Case Pocket Watch 1775